Tag Archives: International Affairs

The Maxwell School Receives Top Ranking for International Global Policy

Today, we are featuring a recent post from the PAIA Admissions blog. U.S. News & World Report has completed its annual rankings of Public Affairs graduate programs and specialties. For 2019, the Maxwell School has been ranked fifth in the country for the International Global Policy and Administration specialty. Overall, Maxwell had ten specialties ranked within the top ten nationally.

Commenting on the rankings, Dean M. Van Slyke said:

“The strength of Maxwell’s professional programs has always been in its flexibility and diversity, drawing not only on the breadth of expertise of its public administration and policy faculty but also its award-winning social science disciplinary scholars.”

Maxwell students focusing on International Global Policy not only enjoy a top ranked specialty, but have the ability to incorporate any of the other nationally-regarded specialties into their curriculum. On top of this, students can engage in coursework from an array of programs also housed in the Maxwell school, including Political Science, Sociology, Anthropology Economics, Geography and History.

Please see the link below for the full article:

The Maxwell School Ranks Top 10 for 10 Public Affairs Specialties

 

Maxwell Programs in East Asia

The Maxwell School offers a variety of opportunities to study or work in East Asia. Through Syracuse University’s partnerships with foreign colleges and companies, students have the chance to live, work (and play) in some of the biggest cultural, political or business centers in the region. Funding to offset airfare and any changes in the cost of living are offered for all opportunities, and is quite generous in some instances.

Beijing. (nemomemini @Flickr)

The Beijing program is offered each fall. Syracuse University runs a center in Beijing in partnership with Tsinghua University, the most prestigious university in China. Tsinghua is located in Beijing’s Wudaokou neighborhood, a student area home to several universities. Maxwell students have the option of taking courses through the center – which offers SU courses taught by SU faculty – or taking graduate courses in English at Tsinghua’s School of Public Policy. Participants can enroll in courses across the social sciences, including Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science and Public Administration, most of which are China-themed. On top of courses, part-time internships are also available for 1 to 3 credits. Past placements include Chinese NGOs, PR firms, the US Embassy in Beijing and various Chinese research organizations.

Singapore. (Copyright: Google)

The Singapore program is a summer internship program. As Singapore is one of Asia’s leading international business hubs, students typically work full-time at finance, business or trade-related organizations. Past placements have included US multinationals, TEMASEK (a Singapore sovereign wealth fund), and the American Chamber of Commerce. Maxwell students can take up to six credits – their internship and an independent study.

Seoul. (HR AN@Flickr)

The Maxwell School also offers fall programs at local universities in Seoul or Tokyo. Both programs offer a diverse set of social science courses, in an Asian context. In Seoul, graduate students take International Relations coursework in English at Yonsei University or Korea University. It is possible for students to intern while studying, but this program does not help with placement. Students interested in studying in Japan can do so at Waseda University’s Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies, located in downtown Tokyo. No Japanese language skills are required, but students must enroll in Japanese language courses while studying.

The Maxwell School’s List of Global Programs

SU Beijing

Singapore Summer Internship Program

World Partner Program in Seoul

World Partner Program in Tokyo

Kim Hyunjong, Strengthening Relationships Between ROK & USA at Korean Embassy

Hyunjong Kim was an MAIR student who graduated in December 2015. He wrote this post last fall while still interning. While completing his coursework in Syracuse, he also worked as a Research Assistant  in the Korean Peninsula Affairs Center (KPAC) of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

Kim Hyunjong, standing in Korean Ambassador's residence in Washington D.C.
Hyunjong Standing in the Korean Ambassador’s residence in Washington D.C.

Established in 1949 in Washington D.C., the heart of international politics, The Embassy of the Republic of Korea in the USA has engaged in and continued its efforts to strengthen the relationship between ROK and the U.S. and deepen the bilateral cooperation in addressing local, regional, and global challenges. Its missions are to (1) improve the rights and interests of Koreans in the U.S., (2) advance the bridge between ROK and the U.S., which helps expand the understanding of each country’s politics, economy, and cultures, and (3) display ROK’s responsibility and accountability as a member of the international community.

The political section, where I am currently interning, carefully follows diplomat relations, multilateral negotiations and announcements where the U.S. is engaged in. Also, the main duties of the research team in the political section are to (1) research on political/foreign policy issues, (2) analyze and report on think tank seminars and publications on international affairs, (3) analyze and report on relevant statements, briefings, and publications released by the U.S. government, and (4) translate various documents from English to Korean and vice versa in order to report to the headquarters, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in Seoul.

I have been very impressed by how hard and diligent all of the diplomats and researchers work in promoting the relationship between ROK and the U.S. I was also surprised by the dynamic daily assignments I have every day, which is far from my initial expectations based on my previous experience in a bureaucratic system. Working with passionate and energetic people who are equipped with sufficient knowledge and understanding about issues I am interested in, always motivates and encourages me to navigate what I should focus on. Also, I am able to learn what is needed to improve myself and what I am confident in. I’ve learned that it is important to understand that my work would contribute to making ROK a better place.

The positive point of an internship with the Korean embassy is the ability to expand my personal networks, which brings me to achieve much information that I wouldn’t have been able to gain if I didn’t work here. By working with colleagues, I am able to hear from what characteristics are needed to be foreign affair officers. In addition to that, I am able to learn how to see things thoroughly while keeping one’s own view when communicating with foreign counterparts. Also, when there are issues that capture many international actors’ attention such as the Iran nuclear agreement or ASEAN forum, I try to ask how diplomats view these incidents. By doing so, I have a better understanding of what perspective Korea should maintain.

Another advantage of working at the embassy is that I have a chance to attend various seminars where regional experts attend and comprehend what their views are. Also, learning personal attitudes to other people is also one benefit that I have learned.

Diplomats’ understanding of global issues and foreign affairs are very crucial, and I am honored to witness those personalities in person. Working at the embassy is one of the unforgettable experiences that I have done. I am also able to bring my academic knowledge when I ask questions of diplomats who have an active role in practical fields.

Learn more about the Maxwell-in-Washington program

After helping to organize the U.S. Gala Dinner at which Korean president's visited, Hyunjong and other interns are taking a picture to memorize this moment
After helping to organize the U.S. Gala Dinner at which the Korean President visited, Hyunjong (center) and other interns took a picture to remember this moment.
Kim Hyunjong ,other interns and researchers in Korean Ambassador's residence
Kim Hyunjong ,other interns, and researchers in Korean Ambassador’s residence
Hyunjong in front of Korean Ambassador's residence in Washington D.C.
Hyunjong in front of Korean Ambassador’s residence in Washington D.C.